Editorial Board
Dr. Salam Sabbar Tawfiq Dr. Salam Sabbar Tawfiq
Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Department of Physical & Environmental Physics, University of Toronto, Canada
Specialty: Physics
Email Address: salam.tawfiq[at]utoronto.ca
Phone: +16472711307

CURRICULUM VITAE

Prof. Salam Tawfiq

 

A. BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

1. PERSONAL

University Address: University of Toronto at Scharborough (UTSC)

Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences

Room SW-511, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4, Canada

Office Phone No.: +(416) 287-7243

Fax No.: +(416) 287-7279

Home Address: 739 Aspen Road, Pickering, Ontario , L1V 3P4 , Canada

Home Phone No.: +(647) 2711307

Citizenship: Canadian

 

2. DEGREES

-Ph.D. Degree in High Energy Physics: 1993, Department of Theoretical Physics, University

of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

Title of graduate thesis: Semileptonic Decay of Heavy Baryons

Supervisors: Prof. Faheem Hussain and Prof. Giuseppe Furlan, International Center for

Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

 

-M. Sc. Degree in Physics (Theoretical): 1982, Department of Physics, College of Science,

University of Al-Mustansiriyah, Baghdad, Iraq.

Title of thesis: Tachyon Photon-Like Interactions

Supervisor: Prof. Habeeb M.A.Z., Nuclear Research Center, Iraqi Atomic Energy Commission

(IAEC), Tuwaitha, Baghdad, Iraq.

 

-B. Sc. Degree : 1979, Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Al-

Mustansiriyah, Baghdad, Iraq.

 

3. EMPLOYMENT

Present appointment: Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Physics, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences (DPES), University of Toronto at Scar- borough (UTSC).

 

Previous research and teaching appointments:

Teaching:

(a) Sept., 2000 { May, 2003

Lecturer, Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Taught the Graduate courses: PHY2107F and PHY2404S

Taught the Undergraduate courses: PHY138Y, PHYA21HS, PSCD01HS, PHY307F, PHY352F, PHY309S and PHY245S (Outlines and a complete list of the courses taught at the University of Toronto since 2000 are provided separately at the end)

 

(b) Sept., 1998 { Aug. 2000

Teaching Associate and Resource Center Person: Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Taught the courses: PHY138Y and PHY180F, St. George Street campus.

Taught the courses: PHYA20, PHYB20, PHYA10, PHY135Y and PHYA21,

Scarborough College and Erindale College campuses.

 

(c) Dec., 1988 { Aug., 1989

Lecturer, Taught the courses (Classical Mechanics and Introduction to Atomic Physics), Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Al-Anbar, Al-Anbar, Iraq.

 

(d) Sept., 1985 { Sept., 1988

Lecturer (Part Time), Taught the courses (Waves and Vibrations, Atomic and Molecular physics and Introduction to Quantum Mechanics), Department of Physics, College of Education, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad, Iraq.

 

Research:

(a) Sept., 1997 { Aug. 1998 Research Associate: High Energy Physics Theoretical group, Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

 

(b) Sept., 1995 { Dec., 1996 Postdoctoral follow, Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita' di Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

 

(c) Sept., 1993 { Dec., 1995

Research Fellow, Phenomenological Group, High Energy Physics Section, International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy.

 

(d) July, 1983 { Dec., 1988 Scienti_c Researcher, Nuclear Research Center, Iraqi Atomic Energy Commission (I.A.E.C.), Tuwaitha, Baghdad, Iraq.

 

B. Academic Positions

1. Physics Discipline Representative in DPES (2015-2019)

2. DPES Executive Committee (2015-2019)

3. DPES PTR, Outreach Committees (2014-2019)

4. DPES Teaching Curriculum Committees (2015-present) item SUPERVISOR of Major Program in Physical Sciences (2019-present)

5. SUPERVISOR of Major Program in Physics and Astrophysics (2015-present)

6. SUPERVISOR of Specialist Program in Physics and its Applications at UTSC (2015-16)

7. Coordinator of Procurement Initiatives for the DPES Physics Laboratories (2015-16)

8. PHYD01H3F Coordinator of Supervised Reading in Physics Astrophysics (2015-2019)

9. PHYD72H3F Coordinator of Supervised Reading in Physics Astrophysics (2015-2019)

10. SUPERVISOR of Major Program in Physics and Astrophysics (2014-15, 2016-17)

11. Physics Discipline Representative in DPES (2009-10)

12. SUPERVISOR of Specialist Program in Physics and its Applications at UTSC (2003-2008)

13. Member of the UTSC ACADEMIC COMMITTEE as a representative Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences (2003-2008)

14. Member of the ACADEMIC COMMITTEE at the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences (2003-2008)

 

C. SCHOLARLY AND PROFESSIONAL WORK

1. Subjects of interest

(a) Physics Education Research:

I am interested in theories and models that concentrate on the foundations of University Teaching in general and Physics Education in particular. We try to shift the focus from teaching to student learning by changing students' approaches to learning and students' perceptions of their learning environments and their learning outcomes. Some of the research topics include:

i. develop new methods of instruction, particularly for large-enrollment classes;

ii. develop improved curricula to support the new instructional methods;

iii. carry out basic research in the teaching and learning of physics;

iv. use of modern technology and the training and support of science teachers.

 

(b) Phenomenology of Particle Physics:

Heavy Quark Physics, Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), Chiral Models and Light-Cone Formalism.

(c) General Physics:

Classical and Quantum Harmonic Oscillator, Constraint Systems, Superluminal Particles and Shock Waves.

(d) Nuclear Physics:

Models of Nuclear Structure, with particular interest in the IBM and Shell Models, Fission Models and Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics.

 

2. Refereed Publications:

(a) Recent Developments in Teaching and Learning:

Teaching Quantum Mechanics as a case study. Contribution to the Annual conference for graduate students, invited plenary talk, University of , Al Nahrain, Dec 16, 2016. To be published in the proceedings.

 

(b) Low-energy Behavior of QCD at Di_erent Energy Scales.

Contribution to the 21st International conference on Physics for Sustainable Development, invited plenary and review talk, Baghdad, Oct. 28-30, 2014. To be published in the proceedings.

(c) Improving Quantum Mechanics Teaching and Learning.

Contribution to the 21st International conference on Physics for Sustainable Development, Poster and a talk, Baghdad, Oct. 28-30, 2014. To be published in the proceedings.

(d) Electromagnetic Transitions of Heavy Baryons in the SU(3)_O(3) symmetry. Phys. Rev. D63 (2001) 034005. Salam Tawfiq, J.G. Korner and P.J. O'Donnell.

 

(e) One{Pion Transitions Between Heavy Baryons in the Constituent Quark Model . Phys. Rev.D61(2000)114003. F. Hussain, J.G. Korner and Salam Tawfiq.

(f) P wave to S wave pion transitions of charmed baryons. Phys Rev D 59 (1999) 1140. Salam Tafiq, P. J. O'Donnell and J.G. Korner.

(g) Charmed Baryon Strong Coupling Constants in a Light-Front Quark Model.

Phys Rev D 58 (1998) 054010. Salam Tawfiq, P. J. O'Donnell and J.G. Korner.

(h) Hamilton-Jacobi Treatment of Gauge Field Theories as Constrained Systems. Hadronic Journal 20(1997)239. Rabei and Salam Tafiq.

(i) SU(2Nf )_O(3) Light Diquark Symmetry and Current-Induced Heavy Baryon Transition Form Factors. Z. Phys C69(1996)655. F. Hussain, J.G. Korner, J. Landgraf and Salam Tawfiq.

(j) General Analysis of Weak Decay Form Factors in Heavy to Heavy and Heavy to Light Baryon Transitions . Nucl. Phys. B370(1992)259. F. Hussain, D. S. Liu, J.G. Korner and Salam Tawfiq.

 

3. Non-Refereed Publications:

(a) Semileptonic Decay of Heavy Baryons in a Covariant Quark Model. Salam Tafiq, DFT preprint (University of Trieste, Italy), UTS-DFT-95-09, 1995.

(b) _b ! _c Exclusive Weak Decays in a Light-Cone Model . F. Hussain, D. S. Liu and Salam Tafiq, ICTP preprint, IC/93/25, 1993.

(c) The Nambu-Jona-Lasinio Model in a Magnetic Field With Variable Direction. R. Ragazzon and Salam Taw_q, ICTP preprint, IC/96/74, University of Trieste Preprint, UTS-DFT-96-08.

Internal Reports, Iraqi Atomic Energy Commission (IAEC), Nuclear Research Center, in collaboration with Prof. Habeeb M. A. Z.

 

(a) Coherent States for the Cranked Harmonic Oscillator, 1987.

(b) On the Parallel Axis Theorem for Cranking Moments of Inertia, 1987.

(c) Evaluation of the Block Density Matrix for a Cranked Oscillator in a Magnetic Field by Canonical Transformations, 1987.

(d) Core Polarisation in the Interacting Boson Model, 1987.

(e) Fluid Dynamical Interpretations of Quantum Damped Oscillators, 1987.

(f) Nuclear Collisions in the Time-Dependent Cluster Model, 1986.

(g) Comparison of the Interacting Boson Model with Other Collective Models, 1986.

(h) Classical Limit of the Damped Harmonic Oscillator Wave Functions, 1986.

(i) On the Quantum Mechanical Oscillator with Variable Damping, 1986.

(j) Study of the Finite Boson Number in the Interacting Boson Model (IBM), 1985.

(k) On the SL(3,R) Group and the Harmonic Oscillator with Variable Damping, 1985.

(l) Nuclear Currents in the Cranked Cluster Model, 1985.

(m) Solution of the Two-Center Harmonic Oscillator Model for Nuclear Fission Calculations,

1984.

(n) Calculation of Shell E_ects for Some Fissioning Nuclei Using the Two-Center Harmonic

Oscillator Model, 1984. 4. Review Committees and Review of Physics Text books:

(a) Member of the committee for the review of "The Province of Ontario Physics Curriculum for Grades 11 and 12", May 2008.

(b) Member of the committee for the review of "The Teaching and Learning Services at UTSC ", June 2007.

(c) Member of the committee for the review of "The Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences at UTSC", May 2007. I have participated in reviewing the following physics text books:

(a) "Physics for Scientists and Engineers: An Interactive Approach", 1st edition by R. Hawkes, J. Iqbal, Fi. Mansour, Milner-Bolotin P. Williams published by Nelson publishing Co.

(b) "Physics for the Life Sciences", 3rd Edition by Martin Zinke-Allmang, University of

Western Ontario, Published by McGraw Hill publishing Co.

(c) "College Physics", 1st edition by Giambatista, Richardson and Richardson, Cornell University, Published by McGraw Hill publishing Co.

(d) "Physics for Scientists and Engineers", 1st edition by Eric Mazur, Harvard University, To be published by Pearson Education.

 

D. Conferences and Workshops High Energy Physics

1. ICTP Summer School in high energy physics and cosmology, June 29 - July 17, 1989, Trieste, Italy

 

2. ICTP Summer School in Particle Physics, Trieste, Italy, June 18 - July 28, 1990, Trieste,

Italy

 

3. FIFTH Workshop on Perspectives in Nuclear Physics at Intermediate Energies, May (6 - 10), 1991, Trieste, ITALY

 

4. ICTP Summer school on Astro-particle Physics and Cosmology, June 17 - August 9, 1991,

Trieste, Italy

5. ICTP Summer School on Particle Physics, Trieste, Italy, June 15 - July 31, 1992, Trieste, Italy.

 

6. TRIESTE Conference on Quarks and Leptons: Masses and Mixings, October (7-11), 1996

 

7. MRST (Montreal, Rochester, Syracuse, Toronto) '98 conference in High Energy Physics, May 13-15, 1998, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

 

8. MRST (Montreal, Rochester, Syracuse, Toronto) '00 conference in High Energy Physics, May 8-9, 2000, Rochester, New York, USA.

 

9. 1st International conference on Physics for Sustainable Development?, Baghdad, Oct. 28-30, 2014.

 

Teaching and Learning

1. Nexus Conference, May 8 and 9, 2003, Toronto, Canada (Oral, invited).

2. College Physics Symposium, November 7 and 8, 2003, San Diego, USA (Oral, invited).

3. Symposium on Teaching and Learning, Oct. 30, 2006, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

4. Symposium on Teaching and Learning, Oct. 25, 2007, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

5. Workshop on multiple choice testing, UTSC, November 10, 2008, Toronto, Canada. choice

testing.

6. Strategies for Success workshop, May 2, 2009, Marriott Bloor Yorkville hotel, Toronto, Canada.

7. As a_liate of (CIDEC), I have attended seminars organised by (CIDEC) "the Comparative, International and Development Education Centre" at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto.

8. As a_liate of (SMT), I have attended seminars organized by (SMT) the "Centre for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, OISE, University of Toronto 9. 2005 Canadian Association of Physicists congress, June 5-8, 2005, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

10. 2007 Canadian Association of Physicists congress, June 17-20, 2007, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan, Canada

11. 2009 Canadian Association of Physicists congress, June 7-10, 2009, Universit de Moncton,

New Brunswick, Canada

 

E. LIST OF COURSES TAUGHT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

1. Undergraduate Courses

(a) Scarborough campus, PHYC50H3, "Electromagnetic Theory", 2019-2020.

This third year course deals with Solving Poisson and Laplace equations via method of images and separation of variables, Multipole expansion for electrostatics, atomic dipoles and polarizability, polarization in dielectrics, Ampere and Biot-Savart laws, Multipole expansion in magnetostatics, magnetic dipoles, magnetization in matter, Maxwell?sequations in matter.

 

(b) Scarborough campus, PHYB56H3, "Introduction to Quantum Physics", 2015-2016 and f2018-2020. The course introduces the basic concepts of Quantum Physics and Quantum Mechanics starting with the experimental basis and the properties of the wave function. Schrdinger'sequation will be introduced with some applications in one dimension. Topics include Stern-Gerlach e_ect; harmonic oscillator; uncertainty principle; interference packets; scattering and tunnelling in one-dimension.

 

(c) Scarborough campus, PHYA11H3, " Introduction to Physics IB" , 2015-1218.

This first course in Physics at the university level is intended for students enrolled in the Life sciences. It covers fundamental concepts of classical physics and its applications to macroscopic systems in one and three dimensions. It deals with two main themes; which are Particle and Fluid Mechanics and Waves and Oscillations. The approach will be phenomenological with applications related to life and biological sciences.

 

(d) Scarborough campus, PHYB54HF, " Mechanics: From Oscillation to Chaos" , 2012-1215.

The linear, nonlinear and chaotic behaviour of classical mechanical systems such as oscillators and central _eld systems. The course will develop analytical and numerical tools to solve such systems and determine their basic properties. The course will include mathematical analysis, numerical exercises (Python), and demonstrations of mechanical systems.

 

(e) Scarborough campus, PHYB54HF, " Mechanics: From Oscillation to Chaos" , 2012-1215.

The linear, nonlinear and chaotic behaviour of classical mechanical systems such as oscillators, rotating bodies, and central _eld systems. The course will develop analytical and numerical tools to solve such systems and determine their basic properties. The course will include mathematical analysis, numerical exercises (Python), and demonstrations of mechanical systems.

 

(f) Scarborough campus, PHYA10HS, "Introduction to Physics-IA" , 2014-15 and (2018-2020).

This is a _rst year course o_ered at the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences for physical and mathematical sciences students at the University of Toronto @ Scarborough. The number of students enrolled in this course usually about 110 students. It covers three important topics, which can be considered as the basis for Classical Physics . The Mechanics part, introduces Newtons Laws of motion and important conservation laws related to Momentum, Energy and angular Momentum. As applications we study basic concepts of vibration as an introduction of waves.

 

(g) Scarborough campus, PHYC54HS, "Mechanics: From Oscillations to Chaos" , 2014-15.

A course that will concentrate in the study of symmetry and conservation laws, stability and instability, generalized co-ordinates, Hamilton?s principle, Hamilton?s equations, phase space, Liouville?s theorem, canonical transformations, Poisson brackets, Noether? stheorem.

 

(h) Scarborough campus, PHYB21HS, "Electricity and Magnetism" , 2014.

A first course at the intermediate level in electricity and magnetism. The course provides an in-depth study of electrostatics and magnetostatics. Topics examined include Coulomb's Law, Gauss's Law, electrostatic energy, conductors, Ampere's Law, magnetostatic energy, Lorentz Force, Faraday's Law and Maxwell's equations.

 

(i) Scarborough campus, PHYC24HS, "Quantum Physics-I" , 2008.

This course build on the fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics students studied in the second year course PHYB24 through the introduction of more applications to Physical problems. We start with the review of the formalism of Quantum mechanics. Then Schrdinger equation in three dimensions will be solved in a number of potentials. We then study the angular momentum formalism in general and, as an application in 3- dimensions, the Hydrogen Atom will be discussed. Time independent and time dependent approximation methods will then be introduced with applications to atomic, molecular and nuclear physics. Finally, we discuss the quantum description of identical particles.

 

(j) Scarborough campus, PHYB25HS, "Foundation of Modern Physics" , 2007.

This is a 2nd year course which is taken by physical science students at Scarborough campus. It deals with the fundamental principles of modern Physics. First we start with the special theory of relativity, studying its basic concepts, postulates and their consequences. The mathematical formalism of the theory, using four-vectors (Tensors), will be introduced. We then investigate some of its application. The second part of the course covers the basis of Quantum Mechanics. We start with the failures of classical physics in describing several physical phenomena such as: Back body radiation; photoelectric effect; particle nature of waves; Compton scattering; wave nature of particles; atomic energy levels and atomic spectra. We then introduce Schrdinger equation and the basic formalisms of Quantum mechanics. As applications we discuss solutions for one-dimensional systems (in_nite well, square well, harmonic oscillator).

 

(k) Scarborough campus, PHYB20H3S , "Vibrations and Waves", 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006.

This course introduces the concept of Waves in general and some of its physical applications. It covers the following topics: Harmonic oscillation; forced and Damped oscillation; Fourier Series; Hamilton Principle and Lagrange Dynamics; coupled oscillators; Continuous Systems (waves); Propagation of Waves, Energy Transfer, Dispersion, 2- and 3-dimensional waves; electromagnetic waves; interference and di_raction. Students will also write a paper on one of the topics related to Classical waves. We encouraged and helped students to utilize the visualization power of Maple as a tool to analyze most of the problems.

 

(l) Scarborough campus, PHYA22HS, "Introduction to Physics-IIB" , 2008.

This course deals with physical theories such as Electricity and magnetism, Modern Optics and Nuclear Radiation as an application of the Quantum theory. It also covers some of the applications of modern physics such as Atomic physics and nuclear radiation. It is offered for students in Life Science, Bio Science and Environmental Science who are studying at the University of Toronto (UTSC)

 

(m) Scarborough campus, PHYA10H3F, "Introduction to Physics-I" , 2004-05 and 2005-06.

This is a _rst year course o_ered at the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences for physical and life sciences students at the University of Toronto @ Scarborough. The number of students enrolled in this course usually about 280 students. It covers three important topics, which can be considered as the basis for Classical Physics. The Mechanics part, introduces Newtons Laws of motion and important conservation laws related to Momentum, Energy and angular Momentum. In the second part, we deal with basic ideas of Fluid Mechanics, developed by Archimedes, Pascal and others. Finally, We study the principles of the Kinetic Theory of Gases and the Laws of Thermodynamics, developed by Boltzmann, Joule, Carnot, Kelvin and others during the 19th century.

 

(n) Scarborough campus, PHYB24HS, "Principles of Quantum Physics" , 2005, 2006 and 2007.

This is a 2nd year course which is taken by physical science students at Scarborough campus. The course introduces students to one of the fundamental theories of modern science of the 20th century. We start by reviewing topics related to the failure of classical physics. those include black body radiation, Compton scattering and particle-wave Duality. quantum mechanics postulates are then introduced. Application in one and three dimensions are discussed to help students mastering the mathematical aspect of the theory. Treatment of Angular momentum and the Hydrogen atom, as an example of this is discussed in detail. Spin-orbit and relativistic effect of the hydrogen levels are explored.

 

(o) Scarborough campus, PHYA21HS, "Principles of Physics-II" , 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007.

This is a _rst year course which is taken by physical and life science students at Scarborough campus. The number of students enrolled in this course usually about 180 students. The course covers three important topics, which constitute the basis for the modern science of the 20th century. The Field and Waves part introduces the Electromagnetic Theory developed at the end of the 19th century by Maxwell. The Theory of Special Relativity, developed by Einstein at the beginning of the 20th century. We study the principles and some important applications of the Quantum Theory, developed during the _rst three decades of the 20th century by many physicists among them Bohr, Heisenberg and Pauli.

 

(p) Scarborough campus, PHYA10H3S, "Introduction to Physics-I" , 2004.

This is also a _rst year course o_ered for Physical and life Sciences students at the University of Toronto @ Scarborough. The number of students enrolled in this course usually about 150 students. It is identical to PHYA10F except it is o_ered during the Winter (Spring) term.)

 

(q) Scarborough campus, PSCD01HS, "Physical Sciences and Contemporary Society", 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007.

The majority of students enrolled in this course are from the so called "Early Teaching Program (ETP)". Most of students majoring in physical sciences acquire a good basic understanding of their discipline as a body of knowledge. They are familiar with its governing theories, its vocabulary etc. But they are far less likely to have thought much about broader and more basic issues about, for instance, the relationship in science between fact and theory, about the nature of scienti_c theories and, more important, the role of science as well as its implications (positive and negative) on the society. This course is designed to give students a fuller appreciation and deepen their understanding of science.

 

(r) St. George campus, PHY138Y, "Physics for the Life Sciences I" , 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006 summer.

This is the largest course (as far as the number of students enrolled) offered at the department of Physics. It is a 1st year course taken by Life and Medical science students at the St. George campus. The number of students, enrolled in this course, is usually more than 800 students. PHY138Y is divided into FOUR sections: Nuclear Physics, Mechanics, Waves and light and Electricity and magnetism. I taught the mechanics section, which covers the following topics. Motion and Force, Gravitation, Kinetic and potential Energy, Conservation of Energy, Momentum and Impulse, Rotational Motion and Rotational Dynamics.

 

(s) St. George campus, PHY352F, "Electromagnetic Theory" , 2000, 2001 and 2002.

This course is about the classical aspects of Electricity and Magnetism. It starts by introducing vector analysis to enhance the mathematical background, which are necessary during the course. We then proceed with the general solutions of problems in Electrostatic and Magnetostatic, like Laplace and Poisson equations. It then analyse Electrodynamics, Electromagnetic waves, Electromagnetic Potential and Fields and special theory of relativity until we reach the _nal goal, which is the formulation of Electrodynamics using the theory of Relativity.

(t) St. George campus, PHY309S, "Quantum Methods using Computer Algebra",2000-2001.

This course requires the use of the computer environment Maple, which provides an excellent tool for visualizing and analytically solving complicated mathematical problems. We analyze several classical problems of Quantum Mechanics using Maple. This year we covered step potentials in one and three dimensions, the Harmonic Oscillator, the Hydrogen atom, WKB and Variational method as examples of the perturbation theory. The Crank-Nicholson algorithm was employed to numerically solve the time dependent Schrodinger equation to analyze scattering of plane waves from potential barrier.

 

(u) Mississauga campus, PHY245S , "Vibration and Waves", 2000-2001.

The course covers the general aspects of classical waves. We employed the visualization power of Maple as a tool to analyze most of the problems. We start by analyzing the Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) of a free oscillator. We then move to study more realistic systems which involve damping forces and/or external driving forces. We then proceed to analyze the so called "coupled oscillators" which represent the _rst step toward the study of continuous systems. At this stage we can introduce the "Fourier analysis" which is a powerful tool to study continuous systems. As a _nal topic, we derive the wave equation and provide its general solution in terms of the superposition of various solution.

 

(v) St. George campus, PHY307F, "Introduction to Computational Physics", 1999- 2000.

In this course we give an overview of some areas of computation of particular importance to physics. The approach is broad rather than deep. In all cases, the computation is closely tied to real physics problems. The terminology of the course closely follows that of our undergraduate laboratories. Also in common with those labs, there is an emphasis on error analysis throughout. The topics covered are Polynomial _tting, Physical Pendulum, solving the one dimensional Heat Equation using the explicit and implicit methods and the Crank-Nicholson algorithm, Monte Carlo modeling of high energy physics data and the study of chaotic systems.

 

2. Graduate Courses

(a) St. George campus, PHY2404S , "Quantum Field Theory". 2000-2001

This course builds on a previous course called "Foundations of Particle Physics" PHY1810. It covers Perturbative Gauge Theories, QCD, non Abelian Gauge Theories, Path integral quantization, Feynman rules, Regularization, Renormalization, Renormalization group equations and Asymptotic freedom in QCD and other _eld theories.

 

(b) St. George campus, PHY1489F, "Introduction to High Energy Physics" . 2001- 2002

The course provides an introduction to the Standard Model of particle physics. After a brief introduction, we will cover relativistic kinematics, symmetries and conservation laws, and the use of Feynman diagrams and Feynman rules in the description of fundamental processes. These tools will be used to perform basic calculations of particle decay rates and scattering cross-sections. The course will progress from quantum electrodynamics, the theory of electromagnetic interactions, to investigations of the strong and weak interactions. If time permits, there will be a basic introduction to gauge theories.

 

(c) St. George campus, PHY2107F, "Experimental methods in Physics" . 2000-2001

This is seminar type course where a number of speakers with di_erent experimental specilties were invited to give a seminar. Some speakers were from the department and others were from the industry. The topics change from year to year. For this year the topics include experiments in NMR/Cryogenic, Cosmic background, High Energy Physics, Atmospheric Physics and laser. Speakers will also o_er a tour to their labs. To show students their experiments.

(d) Yarmouk University, Jordan, PHY611 , "Classical Mechanics". 2010-2011

The course covers the following advanced topics in classical mechanics including:Variational Principles, Lagrangians, and Hamiltonians, Some Applications to dynamical systems, Continuous Systems and Fields and General Hamiltonian Formulation.

 

(e) Yarmouk University, Jordan, PHY643 , "Elementary Particle Physics". 2010- 2011

The course covers the foundation of particle physics iThe topics nuclide: Special Relativity and Classical Field Theory Review, Feynman Diagrams, Symmetries, Quantum Electrodynamics, Hadrons and Partons, Quantum Chromodynamics and Electroweak Theory.